Bakaity-Poetry

बनारसी और बम्बइया

August 19, 2014 at 12:39am
1,769 notes
Reblogged from akadaniel

deepseathoughts:

Privilege (Yvonne Rainer, 1990)

(Source: akadaniel, via eclektic)

12:38am
4 notes
Reblogged from weil-weil

Eduardo Galeano: Century of Disaster →

August 18, 2014 at 9:10am
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189 - Subcontinental Drift: Philosophy in Islamic India | History of Philosophy without any gaps →

Ideas spread to Mughal India from Iran, and prince Dārā Shikūh seeks to unite the wisdom of the Upanishads with the Koran.

August 15, 2014 at 2:58pm
1 note

Alain Badiou's "anti-Semitism": Badiou, Segré, and Winter respond to the current accusations in France →

The first point can be left to the judgement of public opinion: I have no problems if those who prefer Professor Bensussan’s great intellectual contributions to my own mediocre efforts want to make themselves known. The second point, as I already said in regard to certain of his foregoers, is a matter for the courts: other than the fact that there could be no such thing as a far-Left anti-Semitism – an absurd oxymoron – I challenge anyone to find a single line in any of my works that could be called anti-Semitic. But I have no love for the states that exist (and, I might add, that includes the French state no less than the state of Israel), nor, in consequence, for the courts. Instead, I’ll simply give Professor Bensussan a smack in the face if I ever come across him, which will be a richly deserved reward for his muck-spreading rhetoric

2:54pm
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643 Christopher Snedden, The forgotten Poonch uprising of 1947 →

Little has been written about the major events in Jammu Province in 1947 because of Indian and Pakistani neglect. They, and their governments, have been engrossed in their war of words over J&K rather than factually determining what – or who – instigated the Kashmir dispute. Indian analysis of J&K invariably begins with, or conveniently focuses on, Pakistan’s ‘aggression by force’ in J&K that started when Pakistan ‘attacked’ J&K on 22 October 1947 using Pukhtoon tribesmen. It then deals with the international aspects of the Kashmir dispute or discusses the Kashmir Valley and its important coterie of pro-Indian Muslims, where India, initially at least, appeared in a better light than Pakistan. Generally speaking, Pakistanis are uninterested in what happened in Jammu Province in 1947. Rather, they focus on the pro-Pakistan action in Gilgit in November. The India and Pakistan governments also have political reasons for ignoring, negating or even denying the events that occurred in Jammu Province in 1947.

The author is an Australian politico-strategic analyst, author, and academic specializing in South Asia. This essay is extracted from his forthcoming book, Kashmir: The Unwritten History (HarperCollins Publisher India).Reprinted with permission.

August 12, 2014 at 7:09pm
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All established order forms a line of resistance against the threat of rupture and places its meager forces at the service of continuity. That everything should continue as usual is the bourgeois standard of a reality that is indeed bourgeois precisely because it is a standard.

— Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds

7:04pm
1 note

Thirsty for being, the poet ceaselessly reaches out to reality, seeking with the indefatigable harpoon of the poem a reality that is always better hidden, more re(g)al. The poem’s power is as an instrument of possession but at the same time, ineffably, it expresses the desire for possession, like a net that fishes by itself, a hook that is also the desire of the fish. To be a poet is to desire and, at the same time, to obtain, in the exact shape of the desire.

— Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds

6:59pm
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I am talking about the responsibility of the poet, who is irresponsible by definition, an anarchist enamored of a solar order and never of the new order or whatever slogan makes five or six hundred million men march in step in a parody of order.

— Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds

6:56pm
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Happy are those who choose, those who accept being chosen, the handsome heroes, the handsome saints, the perfect escapists.

— Julio Cortázar, Hopscotch

2:37pm
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August 11, 2014 at 1:21pm
214 notes
Reblogged from a-bittersweet-life
a-bittersweet-life:

The spectator always ends up by understanding when you are sincere in what you are telling him. I don’t invent any language to appear simpler, stupider, or smarter. A lack of honesty would destroy the dialogue. Time has worked for me. When people understood that I was speaking a natural language, that I wasn’t pretending, that I didn’t take them for imbeciles, that I only say what I think, then they became interested in what I was doing.
Andrei Tarkovsky

a-bittersweet-life:

The spectator always ends up by understanding when you are sincere in what you are telling him. I don’t invent any language to appear simpler, stupider, or smarter. A lack of honesty would destroy the dialogue. Time has worked for me. When people understood that I was speaking a natural language, that I wasn’t pretending, that I didn’t take them for imbeciles, that I only say what I think, then they became interested in what I was doing.

Andrei Tarkovsky

August 10, 2014 at 11:42am
1 note

हाथ देखने की कविता / नवारुण भट्टाचार्य

मैं सिर्फ कविता लिखता हूँ
इस बात का कोई मतलब नहीं
कइयों को शायद हँसी आए
पर मैं हाथ देखना जानता हूँ

मैंने हवा का हाथ देखा है
हवा एक दिन तूफ़ान बनकर सबसे ऊँची
अट्टालिकाओं को ढहा देगी

मैंने भिखारी-बच्‍चों के हाथ देखे हैं
आने वाले दिनों में उनके कष्‍ट कम होंगे
यह ठीक-ठीक नहीं कहा जा सकता
मैंने बारिश का हाथ देखा है
उसके दिमाग का कोई भरोसा नहीं
इसलिए आप सबके पास ज़रूरी है
एक छाते का होना

स्‍वप्‍न का हाथ मैंने देखा है
उसे पकड़ने के लिए तोड़नी पड़ती है नींद
प्रेम का हाथ भी मैंने देखा है
न चाहते हुए भी वह जकड़े रहेगा सबको

क्रांतिकारियों के हाथ देखना बड़े भाग्‍य की बात है
एक साथ तो वे कभी मिलते नहीं
और कइयों के हाथ तो उड़ गये हैं बम से
बड़े लोगों के विशाल हाथ भी मुझे देखने पड़े हैं
उनका भविष्‍य अंधकारमय है
मैंने भीषण दुख की रात का हाथ भी देखा है
उसकी भोर हो रही है

मैंने जितनी कविताएँ लिखी हैं
उससे कहीं ज्‍यादा देखे हैं हाथ
कृपया मेरी बात सुनकर हँसे नहीं
मैंने अपना हाथ भी देखा है
मेरा भविष्‍य आपके हाथ में है…

11:35am
0 notes

बर्फ और आग / नवारुण भट्टाचार्य

मैं एक छोटे-से शहर में जाकर
           रेकार्ड या पैरांबुलेटर बेच सकता हूँ
मुँह पर आँसुओं का रूमाल बाँध कर मैं
    बच्चों की खिलौना-रेल में डकैती कर सकता हूँ
मैं प्लेटफ़ार्म पर चाक से लिख सकता हूँ
             पैरों से मिट जाने वाली कविता
लेकिन दो लड़कियों से प्रेम करके
मैंने जितना कष्ट पाया था
उसे भूल नहीं सकता कभी।

मैं अपने सीने में शब्दों का छुरा
                      घोंप सकता हूँ
मैं बहुत ऊँची चिमनी के सहारे चढ़कर
      नीचे बायलर की आग में कूद सकता हूँ
मैं समुद्र में कमीज़ धोकर
पहाड़ की हवा में सुखा सकता हूँ
लेकिन दो लड़कियों को बहुत कष्ट से
मैंने इतना प्यार किया था
उसे भूल नहीं सकता कभी।
मैं क्रुद्ध होकर सांघातिक सशस्त्र
            राजनीतिक तूफ़ान खड़ा कर सकता हूँ
ठंडे सिर की शिराएँ नोंचकर
          तार-कटी ट्राम की तरह थम सकता हूँ
चालाकी के ब्रश से रगड़-रगड़कर
         जूते की तरह चेहरे को भी चमका सकता हूँ
लेकिन उन दो लड़कियों से प्रेम करके
मेरा ख़ून बर्फ़ और आग बन गया था
इसे नहीं भूल सकता कभी।

August 9, 2014 at 2:10pm
473 notes
Reblogged from guernicamag

We’re OK in Gaza. They just don’t understand that we’re a peaceful people, full of joie de vivre, who happen to be under attack from a wild animal. What else is there to do but push back with a bit of stubborn strength, scratch at the thing with your bare fingernails, while your veins still have blood in them? What else is there to do but to try to preserve the way we live and the way we want to live—a little bit of joy is enough for us. If our sorrows grow less, and we laugh, then we whisper as quietly as we can, “God protect us from this laughter.” Even laughter is too much for us, and yet our suffering is too little for those who want more of it.

— Atef Abu Saif: We’re OK in Gaza | Guernica - A Magazine of Art & Politics (via fotojournalismus)

(via fotojournalismus)

August 8, 2014 at 9:38am
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Versobooks.com | The Indians of Palestine: An interview between Gilles Deleuze and Elias Sanbar →